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working knives

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working knives

Post by 12acrehome on Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:07 am

We all have some knives we use for many things. The least considered kitchen knife is usually a paring knife, but it is the utility blade of the kitchen. A pocket knife is, at least in my area, also a common utility blade. Fixed blade knives are usually specialized and prized for being a certain brand or type or size. Most are hunting or skinning knives. A few are survival knives, bought for some perceived need. This last group is what I want to discuss here. Good solid multi-purpose fixed bladed knives that can be used, used hard, and at the end of a day of cutting leather, hide, scraping bones, cutting wire, skinning game, etc. will need little attention to be ready to do it again tomorrow.

Years ago (around 1988 or so) I was wanting a survival knife, but not one of those hollow handled el'cheapo's that you can find at most junk stores and flea markets. No I wanted something like a Ka-Bar ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KA-BAR ) but at the time I couldn't afford one. So next best option... a replica! Bad plan. Lots of look alikes, few that match the quality. Those that got the quality right, either were priced out of my reach, or were missing key elements (to my mind) in the design. Until I stumbled across this little gem ( http://policelink.monster.com/products/products/5990-ontario-pilot-survival-knife ) It was in a surplus store and priced right (still is from most outlets).

I have worn off the black oxide coating, and the leather handle needs regular oil soaking to keep it tight, but this has proven to be a quality knife that will stand up to many days work, and even abuse and neglect. I was cleaning out a tool box the other day and ran across this knife after years of just laying around. It took a couple hours of work to bring the edge back to what I call acceptable these days, but it is once again ready to serve any task. I remember skinning and field dressing several (at least three) deer with this knife. I also used it to chop the pelvic bone during the processing of the meat. I did not find any nicks in the blades edge when I inspected it before sharpening. Want an affordable durable working knife?? Try this one.

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Proverbs 28:19  He who works his land will have abundant food...

Genesis 1:29  Then God said,"I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth, and every tree that has fruit with seed in it..."

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Re: working knives

Post by Evie1 on Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:35 am

You know, I totally understand the quality of a good knife. I am a carver, so I had to do much resurrect on metals. and how they hold a edge. hard or soft steel. and how each works. hard tempered steel if very brital. and you can chop a tree down. but the edge wont last. and can break , good for a ax but not so good for a knife. a very soft tempered steel, can hold a edge good, but will bend the edge easy. you have to learn the inbetween. hard and soft. and which mettle mixes works the best. not brand names. I always think it is a good thing to learn as much as you can to do what you wish to do. so cool you found that knife in your tool box, but it is more important to know just why......WHY.... it worked so well. it was not the leather. or the oxide coating. but the mettle. and how it was made. some of the old stuff works so well because someone understood the mix of carbons, steels, and other ingredients involved. I just wish to help. not be a know it all. loved your thread.
Evie
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Re: working knives

Post by 12acrehome on Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:11 am

Glad to hear other's views and have their input, and no I do not think you are a know it all. I make knives as a hobby, thinking about selling a few just to test the market. What I know of Iron and steels, when it comes to blades, you are mostly spot on. The softer steels make better axes, but the angle of the grind makes it durable. With knives you want a fairly hard edge with a softer back, this gives you a good fine edge, that will stay sharp, but the entire blade can flex and not break. An extreme example is a fillet knife, it must be razor sharp, yet very flexible.

_________________
Proverbs 28:19  He who works his land will have abundant food...

Genesis 1:29  Then God said,"I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth, and every tree that has fruit with seed in it..."

http://christiancountryramblings.com/
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Re: working knives

Post by Evie1 on Wed Dec 05, 2012 5:37 am

you know I still have lots to learn. and thanks for clearing me up on the ax thing. is the knives your making for survival use? maybe that is tons different then carving knives, and gouges, and wood turning gouges.
I know the old knives I have from my grandpa. rust and have to keep them clean. but they are still the best kitchen knives I have. the newer ones are mostly stainless still. and so hard to sharpen. and brittle. i have a old very cheap, hunting knife, and I use it for lots of things. soooo. you have spurred my interest. I see I still have lots to learn about steels, and irons, old carbon steel, etc. thanks for putting me straight.
Evie
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Re: working knives

Post by 12acrehome on Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:31 pm

I prefer to work with carbon steel, it is much easier to heat treat. To date I mainly build fillet knives, and general purpose kitchen and belt knives. Nothing really heavy duty enough for what I think a survival knife should be. For those I buy old hunting knives of certain brands that need repair, and reshape the blade and re-handle them. Most have been given to family or friends.

_________________
Proverbs 28:19  He who works his land will have abundant food...

Genesis 1:29  Then God said,"I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth, and every tree that has fruit with seed in it..."

http://christiancountryramblings.com/
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Re: working knives

Post by Rohn on Wed Dec 05, 2012 10:27 pm

I love knives. I have several hunting knives and a few fillet knives and a some pocket knives. I have one pocket knife that I have carried for well over twenty years. It is a Buck knife with three blades. It was purchased when Buck knives were all USA made. Now many Buck knives are made over seas. I always carry two pocket knives.
Since I have been about 8 years old I have never been without a pocket knife.
I also keep on the look out for old knives and fix them up and give them new life. Fixed blade knives get a new sheath too.

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Re: working knives

Post by 12acrehome on Thu Dec 06, 2012 12:25 am

Smile maybe between the two of all the neglected blades of the world can be saved Wink

_________________
Proverbs 28:19  He who works his land will have abundant food...

Genesis 1:29  Then God said,"I give you every seed bearing plant on the face of the whole earth, and every tree that has fruit with seed in it..."

http://christiancountryramblings.com/
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12acrehome
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Re: working knives

Post by mountainmama on Sun Dec 09, 2012 12:31 pm

What a good thread. Now I need to see if there are any threads about sharpening knives at home. If not, maybe someone will start one.

Funny, but I'm okay in the cooking, canning, and sewing areas, but when it comes to simple skills like this, I'm clueless. I'm thinking knife sharpening is the next skill I need to learn.

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Re: working knives

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