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Wish I had found this before we put in our herb garden Empty Wish I had found this before we put in our herb garden

Post by Sonshine on Tue Oct 13, 2009 11:14 pm

http://www.herbcompanion.com/gardening/garden-spaces-plant-a-native-garden.aspx?utm_content=10.13.09+HBC&utm_campaign=Newsletter&utm_source=iPost&utm_medium=email

Garden Spaces: Plant a Native Garden
Try these herbs, wildflowers and ornamental grasses for a difficult site.

October/November 2009 By Kathleen Halloran
Enlarge ImageImage GalleryClick on the IMAGE GALLERY for the planting key.
By Gayle Ford

Article Tools
Image GalleryPrintE-mailCommentsRSS • Design Plans: Native Strip Garden

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Herb Garden Design Plans: A 21st Century Healing Garden
Step outside your door and enter a tranquil sanctuary filled with healing herbs....
When I discover an undemanding plant that thrives in my toughest garden spots, I’m usually not surprised to learn how it comes by its easygoing nature: It’s a native.

The value of native plants is especially evident in difficult climates and in the most challenging areas of your landscape. I live in Texas, where extremes of heat, drought and wind challenge all life forms who dare call it home. But in all regions, native plants often can stand up to the worst you can throw at them. Many are tough, drought-tolerant, heat-resistant, cold-tolerant and low-maintenance—qualities that make them perfect for that patch of horticultural challenge known as The Hell Strip.

That’s the epithet given to the long, narrow strip sandwiched between the street and the sidewalk, usually a rectangle of grass or weeds. Subject to all manner of abuse, these neglected strips are hot and dry in summers, not only because they’re in full sun, but also because they pick up reflected heat from both sides.

Our low-growing garden strip combines native herbs, wildflowers and ornamental grasses for a tough but beautiful tapestry of color and texture. Once established, it will be more drought-tolerant than the turf grass it replaced. As a bonus, the variety of native plants attracts more butterflies, dragonflies, hummingbirds and other native wildlife than a boring strip of grass. You can use this native planting along the street or for any other difficult site, such as along a driveway.

Prepare the Site
Prepare the soil by removing any grass or weeds, roots and rocks, and digging in some compost. Generally speaking, native plants do fine in native soil, but compost will improve almost any soil’s texture, particularly if it’s compacted from constant trampling; your plants will do best in a soil that drains quickly but retains the water and nutrients they need, adding to their drought tolerance.

Just remember, the hard work of preparing a bed is always rewarded in the end. At this time (while preparing the bed), when you’re turning over the soil, add whatever other amendments your soil demands. If you’re uncertain about your soil, have a chat with a county extension agent in your area, or perhaps another gardener in the neighborhood.

Please click on the link for the full article and to see the pictures.

_________________
Sonshine
He who cultivates his land will have plenty of food,
but from idle pursuits a man has his fill of poverty
Proverbs 28:19[b]
Sonshine
Sonshine
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